Police warn of new synthetic drug 'Flakka' 'The $5 Insanity'

This drug can be snorted smoked or injected. It's called "$5 Insanity" but you'll pay a high cost for the cheap high. 

"Flakka" is the latest version of bath salts or synthetic marijuana and police say it is one of the most dangerous new street drugs they have seen.

One Florida man running from cops slowed down only after an impaled leg suffered when trying to climb a 10-foot fence and not making it over.

The streaker is another example of the deadly designer drug. He was reportedly high on Flakka when he took a jaunt through traffic naked.

Lake Orion Police Chief Jerry Narsh warns this paranoia inducing drug is on its way to metro Detroit.

"We're going to see people in the emergency room and quite possibly the morgue," Narsh said. "We know if it's in Florida if it is in Ohio, it's in Michigan. It will be soon be here if it's not here now."

If you know anything about bath salts then you know plenty about Flakka. It's just like the drug that's been outlawed in Michigan but tweaked just enough so that it's barely legal but still very dangerous.

"These patients can somehow get cardiac arrhythmia, seizures, convulsions and like we said even renal failure, kidney disease," said Dr. Shaun Jayakar, an internist with St. John Providence.

FOX 2: "How dangerous can someone be if they take this stuff?"

"Very dangerous you can become homicidal and suicidal," Jayakar said. "Similar to meth, angel dust and high levels of cocaine."

And that's not the only thing that has police worried. 

Flakka reportedly gives users an instant high and super human strength along with it.

"Sometimes you're seeing as many as five or six police officers having to hold down or detain an individual," Narsh said. "So if this drug makes it's way to Michigan, we anticipate violent encounters with law enforcement and citizens."

While Flakka has not been banned in Michigan, state laws are framed in such a way that it can easily be made illegal.

"It allows for law enforcement, doctors and pharmacies or anyone who gets a hold of it, to send that in to the Board of Pharmacy," Narsh said. "They can then test the substance if it's similar in substance to the make up (of Flakka or bath salts) and has no medical purpose, it can be added as a schedule one drug in Michigan."

Parents can look for bizarre behavior and increased strength, but helpful tips to identify the drug is that is looks like rock candy and smells like sweaty socks.
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