Congressional chair calls for U.S. Marshals to 'hunt down' Earley

"He is vital to understanding what happened and how these decisions were made," the chair said of the former emergency manager.

- The Congressional hearing on the Flint Water crisis came to a close nearly four hours after it started. Those in the hot seat were Keith Creagh, the Director of the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and Joel Beauvais, the Deputy Assistant Administrator at the Office of Water and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Marc Edwards from Virginia Teach, who has researched lead and water issues for years, and a resident of Flint were also there as witnesses.

You can watch a replay of the hearing in full on our YouTube page here. 

The day began with Congressional chair committee Jason Chaffetz promising Darnell Earley will eventually be a part of the testimony. Earley was the emergency manager of Flint at the time the water source was switched from Detroit to the Flint River.

"He is vital to understanding what happened and how these decisions were made," Chaffetz says. "Participation before this committee is not optional!"

He said they are calling on help from the U.S. Marshals to subpoena Earley to testify. Chaffetz says the committee was informed Monday night Earley would not attend and that they sent a subpoena Tuesday, which Earley's attorney refused service.

"We're calling on the U.S. Marshals to hunt him down and hand him that subpoena," Chaffetz said while the crowd burst into applause.

FOX 2's Roop Raj has been following the hearing so far, and you can catch a breakdown of the testimony so far in the video player above. To watch the hearing in full, click here

FOX 2 obtained testimony from several witnesses called at the hearing. Perhaps the biggest revelation in the testimony is an apology from Keith Creagh, the Director of the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.

"I want to start by apologizing to the residents of Flint. In retrospect, government at all levels should have done more," he says.

You can read Creagh's advanced testimony in full here.

The bottom line from everyone's testimony is there seems to be a bit of a blame game being played. FOX 2's Roop Raj read through the dozens of pages and reports the EPA (federal government) is assigning blame to the MDEQ (the state of Michigan), while the MDEQ goes on the point fingers at the city of Flint and also back at the EPA.
 
"The MDEQ incorrectly advised the city of Flint that corrosion control treatment was not necessary, resulting in leaching of lead into the City's drinking water. EPA regional staff urged MDEQ to address the lack of corrosion control, but was met with resistance," EPA testimony states. 
 
"My observation is that the EPA did not display the sense of urgency that the situation demanded. This is underscored by the conversations started in February 2015 regarding implementation of the federal Lead and Copper Rule. Between February and the end of September 2015, there were multiple e-mail exchanges and conference calls between the MDEQ and EPA. Yet when the parties were unable to come to consensus on its implementation in July 2015, the EPA failed to provide the legal opinion requested by the MDEQ until November 2015," MDEQ refutes.

Another noteable piece of testimony will come from Joel Beauvais, the Deputy Assistant Administrator at the Office of Water and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

"MDEQ incorrectly advised the City of Flint that corrosion control treatment was not necessary, resulting in leaching of lead into the City’s drinking water. EPA regional staff urged MDEQ to address the lack of corrosion control, but was met with resistance. The delays in implementing the actions needed to treat the drinking water and in informing the public of ongoing health risks raise very serious concerns," he says.

You can read Beauvais' advanced testimony in full here.

More testimony will also come from Marc Edwards from Virginia Teach, who has researched lead and water issues for years.

"The very agencies paid to protect us, not only failed to do so, but also revealed their callous indifference to the plight of our most vulnerable," he wrote.

You can read Edwards' advanced testimony in full here.

This is a developing story. Stay with FOX 2 for updates. 


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