Monday: 35,000 DTE customers still without power

- It's day six without power for thousands of people in metro Detroit who were hit by last week's wicked winds.

DTE's top priority is the 35,000 people who've been in the dark since Wednesday, then they'll tackle an additional 10,000 who lost their electricity in the aftermath.

Tom Smith of Southfield is among those still without power after Wednesday's windstorm storm.

"We do want to thank those customers for your continued patience and also let them know that we understand their frustration," said Heather Rivard, DTE's vice president of distribution operations. "If you're out of power since the storm on wednesday, our goal is to get you back by midnight tonight."

Nearly 800,000 were without power after the wind storm -- the most catastrophic storm in DTE's history.

There were 70 mile per hour winds over a 12-hour period.

DTE has 750 Michigan lineman hard at work along with another 1,000 from seven other states, as well as a thousand tree trimmers.

"They were supposed to have it done last night by 11:30 p.m., so they said they're probably going to have it done tonight by 11:30 p.m.," Smith said.

Smith is staying at a hotel in Novi -- thankful he wasn't a victim of price gouging in the aftermath of the power outage.

"There was one in Auburn Hills for a thousand dollars a night. There was one in Farmington Hills for $760," Smith said.

Over at Hotel Royal Oak, attorney and part owner Jim Rasor says victims of price gouging need to report it to the attorney general.

"When we learned that people were out of power and needed a place to stay, we did what any responsible business owner would do. We ran a promotion for it. We gave them a break because we figured you know, you're out of power, your house is dark, and you're losing your food, we should be here for you -- so that's what we did," Rasor said.

Back at Smith's house, he's just trying to make sure his pipes don't freeze, and looking at his sixth night with no power with patience.

"I know these guys are working really hard. There's a lot of people that have gotten their power back and I'm very grateful for them, but my turn will come," Smith said.

DTE says this is the "most significant weather event" in its more than 100-year history. Wind speeds reached more than 60 mph, which is near tropical storm-force speeds.

For the 35,000 customers still without power, DTE says they know this has been a trying period. As DTE continues to receive information from the field, estimates are being provided to customers. All customers to take caution today as the National Weather Service has issued a winter weather advisory for southeast Michigan.

Temperatures are expected to dip into the teens tonight. Officials have set up warming shelters in cities throughout metro Detroit. To find out near you, visit www.empoweringmichigan.com.

Tom Smith of Southfield is among those still without power after Wednesday's windstorm storm.

"We do want to thank those customers for your continued patience and also let them know that we understand their frustration," said Heather Rivard, DTE's vice president of distribution operations. "If you're out of power since the storm on wednesday, our goal is to get you back by midnight tonight."

Nearly 800,000 were without power after the wind storm -- the most catastrophic storm in DTE's history.

There were 70 mile per hour winds over a 12-hour period.

DTE has 750 Michigan lineman hard at work along with another 1,000 from seven other states, as well as a thousand tree trimmers.

"They were supposed to have it done last night by 11:30 p.m., so they said they're probably going to have it done tonight by 11:30 p.m.," Smith said.

Smith is staying at a hotel in Novi -- thankful he wasn't a victim of price gouging in the aftermath of the power outage.

"There was one in Auburn Hills for a thousand dollars a night. There was one in Farmington Hills for $760," Smith said.

Over at Hotel Royal Oak, attorney and part owner Jim Rasor says victims of price gouging need to report it to the attorney general.

"When we learned that people were out of power and needed a place to stay, we did what any responsible business owner would do. We ran a promotion for it. We gave them a break because we figured you know, you're out of power, your house is dark, and you're losing your food, we should be here for you -- so that's what we did," Rasor said.

Back at Smith's house, he's just trying to make sure his pipes don't freeze, and looking at his sixth night with no power with patience.

"I know these guys are working really hard. There's a lot of people that have gotten their power back and I'm very grateful for them, but my turn will come," Smith said.


  • Popular

  • Recent

Stories you may be interested in - includes Advertiser Stories