Northville man in Paris is safe but 'a little nervous'

- "I opened up my window, just to listen, and you could hear in the distance the gunshots and it appears as if we heard the explosion that took place at the soccer match, too. I mean, it was very far in the distance," says Luis Guajardo. He's from Northville but is in Paris right now. 

He flew into France a day before the terror attacks for a conference. He didn't know what happened right away. He was with a friend from France. The two turned the television on and then looked outside. It didn't take long to know the city was under siege.

"There were two distinct, what sounded like fireworks. At that point, we realized something was going on. There were sirens everywhere. I was actually staying in the area of Trocadéro ... which is by the Eiffel Tower. So I think there was a lot of cops that are going around there, potentially thinking there could be an attack there," Guajardo says.

His family members live here in Detroit. They are still waiting for him to leave Paris on Tuesday. Until then, even he's not at ease. The city is still in shock and, in a sense, seized by the attacks.

"You could say I'm a little nervous. We've been watching the news every day. Today, the press was telling the people to be very careful because of the bombings that they did, they are expecting that there could be more," Guajardo says.

In Lebanon, 50 people died last week, including three locals from Dearborn. Two-hundred-fifty-thousand Lebanese Americans call our area home. With hundreds hurt, the mourning is just starting.

Milad Zohrob is a Christian who is part of the American Lebanese Coalition. He lost a friend from Dearborn who was visiting Beirut at the time of the attack.
 
"There are people in the Detroit area, in Dearborn, that lost family. I lost a friend that I know very, very well. She was doing her doctorate. She had nothing to do with that," he says. 

Paris and Lebanon grabbed the headlines at the start of this week after the attacks, but here in Michigan talks of Syria and its refugees is also taking center stage. Gov. Snyder put a hold on his plan to allow refugees into our state, witing instead on the federal government to put in palce standards to follow for entry.

Gov. Snyder's decision is pulling mixed results from Michiganders. Some argue that the 13 regulations and questions already in place to ask of refugees should suffice for entry. Others agree with Snyder and say it's just too soon after the attack. 

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