Some Detroit teachers consider a strike as outrage grows

There were no sick outs on Friday, but the situation at Detroit Public Schools is far from healthy.

There were no sick outs on Friday, but the situation at Detroit Public Schools is far from healthy.

"We are now approaching the seven-year anniversary as state taking over the Detroit Public Schools," said Mayor Mike Duggan. "Enrollment has declined, deficits have gone up and scores have gone down.

"What we're doing is not working."

On Thursday, the teacher's union held a members only meeting and roughly 1,000 people showed up.

Before the meeting, teachers had a lot of questions about wages, job security, and school conditions. as the reasons behind the sickouts.

"You have to keep the problems in the face of the people," said DPS teacher Joseph Hunter. "You can't allow them to disappear."

After that meeting FOX 2 saw Joseph Hunter again. with a lot of the same questions.

"It's all over the place as a union," Hunter said. "You've got be strong and move forward."

Hunter was at Cass Tech as lawmakers were touring Detroit schools.

"This tour was planned long before sick outs and long before the bills were dropping," said Rep. Sherry Gay-Dagnogo (D-Detroit). "It is excellent timing for us to have this conversation."

The same lawmakers, teachers say can fix the problems within the school.

"Fix the deficit so that we can take the funds to go educate our funds."

However some may feel about the sick-outs, they had the desired effect of garnering attention to a growing problem.

"We are in process of inspecting every single Detroit Public Schools," Duggan said. "And we are going to inspect the charter schools."

And they are getting people to pay attention.

"I'm meeting with the teachers, I am going to have them over for lunch Saturday," Duggan said. "It's not the union, it's frustrated teachers acting on their own."

The question remains. what will happen if no one has the answers these teachers are looking for.

Some DPS teachers left the union meeting with a timetable for a possible strike. They say if they don't see changes in the district by spring, they are prepared to walk off the job.

  • Popular

  • Recent

Stories you may be interested in - includes Advertiser Stories