2018 Michigan elections guide

- Between 7 a.m. and 8 p.m. Tuesday, voters will head to the polls to make some big decisions for the future of Michigan.

Michigan voters will decide on a number of races, including governor, the U.S. Senate, 14 seats in Congress, attorney general, secretary of state, the 38 Michigan Senate seats and 110 House seats, and the Michigan Supreme Court.

There are also three proposals on the ballot:

AM I REGISTERED TO VOTE?

You can check if you are registered to vote by clicking here. The deadline to register to vote in this election -- Tuesday, Oct. 9. -- has already passed.

WHAT'S ON MY BALLOT?

Before you head to the polls, you may want to take a look at your sample ballot. Click here to submit your county, jurisdiction and precinct to see what your ballot will look like on Election Day. While you will receive instructions on how to fill the ballot out at the polls, you can click here to read them beforehand.

WHERE IS MY POLLING LOCATION?

You can figure out where your poll is by clicking here. You'll search for your voter information by your name or by your driver's license number. You'll receive your polling location, your precinct number, and a phone number in case you want to contact them. Polls are open from 7 a.m. until 8 p.m.

WHAT DO I NEED AT THE POLLS?

You do not need your voter registration card to vote. As long as you're at the right polling location, your name will be on the registration list. You will, however, need to show photo ID. If you fail to bring ID, you can still vote, you just have to sign an affidavit that says you don't have photo ID. Acceptable forms include: driver's license, state issued ID card, federal or state government-issued photo ID, U.S. passport, military ID with photo, student ID with photo from high school or higher education, and tribal ID card with photo. The ID doesn't need your address.

REMEMBER

Other helpful information:

- You can't wear items like buttons or T-shirts with election-related materials to the polls. You'll be asked to cover it or remove it.

- You don't have to fill out the entire ballot for your votes to count.

- You cannot use cameras, video or still, at the polls while they're open. 

MORE HELP

Still have questions? Check out the Secretary of State's frequently asked questions. If you still haven't found an answer, click here to find your clerk, who you can contact for specific questions.

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