As dead Chaldean's remains flown home to Detroit, Michigan Congressman blasts deportation policy

As the family of 41-year-old Jimmy Al-Daoud waits for his remains to be flown home from Iraq, a Michigan congressman blasted the policy that deported him there.

"We'd send him back knowing it was a death sentence - knowing that he was someone with bi-polar disorder and schizophrenia and knowing that he was a diabetic - knowing that he had addiction problems," said Rep. Andy Levin. "I mean he didn't last six weeks."

Al-Daoud, who had never lived in Iraq was deported back to the country by ICE officials who said he had committed multiple crimes and had been given a final order of removal, would die from a lack of insulin due to his diabetes.

While he's not the only Chaldean from Detroit to be deported, his story was widely circulated following his death. Levin said those individuals aren't equipped to live there.

"Our state department says no American should travel to Iraq period, because it's too unsafe. Much less the idea of sending someone from a minority religion or someone who doesn't speak Arabic. somebody who's fully Americanized," Levin said. "They just don't have much of a chance."

Levin described the eight deported individuals as "sitting ducks" having talked to them he said they are in hiding, don't have the proper papers and are suicidal.

"I dont' see any policy that is advanced by us sending people back to persecution, torture or even death," said Levin.

Al-Daoud's remains were flown home this week to his family who says they are heartbroken. As his funeral is scheduled, Levin said he's working to gather bi-partisan support for legislation that ends the deportations.

It's an issue often overlooked due to an already intense immigration situation on the southern border. 

"I think that Jimmy's case is helping us change some minds and open some eyes," Levin said. "It would stop the deportations and just give everybody that most American of things: an individualized hearing before a judge."